Society: our approach

Terna provides a service of public utility. Society – understood in both a general sense as the recipient of Terna’s service and a more local sense as the communities more directly affected by investment projects for developing the transmission grid – is an essential stakeholder.

The construction of new electric lines does not entail the physical displacement of individuals or entire communities, but only the use of land – usually agricultural land – with a surface ranging from about 30 to about 250 square metres for every pylon. Even though Terna is authorised by the law to follow an expropriation procedure to obtain the land, the Company prefers solutions based on mutual consent, paying a one-off compensation for the line’s right of way through private land (construction of the pylons, putting up the overhead wires, laying the underground cables). In this case, the owner will no longer be able to use the land occupied by the pylons, it being understood that if the lines are dismantled, the land will once again be at his complete disposal.

When Terna constructs a station, which occupies much more land, the Company normally purchases the necessary land.

Terna considers social, humanitarian, and cultural initiatives to be an integral part of its mission, as concrete signs of its participation in the civil development of the communities in which it carries out its operations. 

As provided for in its Code of Ethicsi, in its relations with institutions and associations, Terna represents its interests and positions in a transparent, meticulous, and consistent manner, avoiding collusive attitudes.

The pursuit of a consensual solution fails only in a minority of cases, making it necessary to use coercive measures. In the three-year period 2007-2009, Terna constructed about 350 km of electric lines, which entailed obtaining easements from about 6,300 land owners. In only 30% of the cases was it necessary to make use of coercion to obtain the right of way. When Terna constructs a station, which occupies much more land, the Company normally purchases the necessary land.

Terna considers social, humanitarian, and cultural initiatives to be an integral part of its mission, as concrete signs of its participation in the civil development of the communities in which it carries out its operations. 

As provided for in its Code of Ethics, in its relations with institutions and associations, Terna represents its interests and positions in a transparent, meticulous, and consistent manner, avoiding collusive attitudes.